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Upcoming Mission Alert: Pilots Needed

Meet "Berni" an Olive Ridley Sea Turtle
Meet "Berni," an Olive Ridley sea turtle, rescued by members of the public at Port Alberni (Vancouver Island) on September 30th, 2019.
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MISSION ALERT!

We're looking for Turtle Fliers to assist with two upcoming transports.

Berni and Pistachio need a ride!

Please review and contact us if you are interested in flying either of these missions.

Mission 1:

Berni Wants to Go Home!

 

From:
Your Choice of 2 Pick-up Options
CYVR Vancouver International Airport
KBFI Boeing Field

To:
KSAN San Diego International

When:
TBD

Berni, an olive ridley sea turtle 

Mission Summary:

This flight is to transport "Berni," an endangered Olive Ridley sea turtle to be released back to the wild in Southern California. TF2 will provide you with a letter of acknowledgement for your in-kind contribution of air transportation and time. For most of our transports we can offer reduced fuel cost and/or reduced or waived landing fees provided by our host airports.

"Berni," an Olive Ridley sea turtle is usually found only in warmer waters. He was rescued by members of the public at Port Alberni (Vancouver Island) on September 30th, 2019 and appeared to be "cold-stunned", a condition that occurs in sea turtles when the water temperature falls below 10 degrees Celsius. Cold-stunned sea turtles experience a decrease in heart rate and circulation causing them to become lethargic to the point where they are unable to swim or forage. Berni is only the fourth Olive Ridley sea turtle recorded in British Columbia waters and only the second of that species to be treated at the rescue centre. Berni has been in rehabilitation since October 1, 2019 at Ocean Wise in Vancouver, BC, and waiting to cross the Canadian borders to return to southern California since May. The normal range for this species is usually found to be in the tropical regions of the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans and it is unusual for an Olive Ridley to be found this far north.

Berni has all required documentation to be transported from Canada to the USA by “Turtle Fliers” for Turtles Fly Too as authorized by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Click here for complete details of mission. If you are a current Turtle Flier, email info@turtlesflytoo.org, if new to Turtles Fly Too, please fill out our Turtle Flier sign up form by clicking here. Mention you are interested in "Berni's mission." 

 

Mission 2:

Pistachio Needs A Ride!

 

From:
KVDF Tampa Executive

To:
KMDW Chicago Midway International Airport

When:
TBD

Mission Summary:

This flight is to transport "Pistachio" a Kemp's Ridley sea turtle to a zoo near Chicago for permanent home. TF2 will provide you with a letter of acknowledgement for your in-kind contribution of air transportation and time from Tampa, FL to Chicago, IL. For most of our transports we can offer reduced fuel cost and/or reduced or waived landing fees provided by our host airports.

“Pistachio” is an endangered Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle that was rescued from Cedar Key after being struck by a boat in August of 2011. Her wounds were quite severe, and she was brought to the Florida Aquarium for treatment of injuries to her head, shell, and spine. Even though her wounds have healed, and she has recovered remarkably, she suffers from some chronic problems that make it unlikely that she would survive in the wild.

Pistachio has all required documentation to be transported within the USA by volunteer pilots for Turtles Fly Too as authorized by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Click here for complete details of mission. If you are a current Turtle Flier, email info@turtlesflytoo.org, if new to Turtles Fly Too, please fill out our Turtle Flier sign up form by clicking here. Mention you are interested in "Pistachio's mission." 

 

About the author

Leslie J. Weinstein

Leslie J. Weinstein

Leslie J. Weinstein, Founder and President, Turtles Fly Too

Born and raised in the St Augustine area, I spent most of my youth along the beaches near my home. Even as a child, the sea turtles that laid their eggs on our property fascinated me. I found myself ever protective of them as I often rescued many eggs from other beaches where turtle nests were being robbed for profit or vandalized by beachgoers for sport. Little did I realize that nearly 30 years later, those very same sea turtles would return to these same beach dunes where I hid their eggs as a kid. Our passion for the preservation of sea turtles and for research and education to further sea turtle conservation is what encouraged my wife Linda and I to donate our beach-front property to the UF ACCSTR to support the continued existence of sea turtle conservation.